Concord Grape Blossoms

Concord Grapes at Paper Crane Farm
Concord Grapes at Paper Crane Farm

Honestly, I never knew grapes had pretty pink blossoms.  These are Concord grapes, developed from native grapes right down the street in Concord, MA in 1853.  Even if folks are unfamiliar with the name, everyone knows Concord grapes by their flavor.  It is the grape flavor we all grew up with in Welch’s grape juice, jelly, popsicles, etc.  According to the plaque in Concord Center, “In 1869 Dr. Thomas B. Welch of Vineland, New Jersey pioneered a method of processing Concord grapes into pure unfermented grape juice and thus laid the foundation for an entire new industry.”  I always thought that this was kind of neat.

“These Concord grape vines were planted to honor Ephraim Wales Bull, a citizen of Concord, who in 1853, perfected a native American grape that, in Mr. Bull’s words, was ‘Delicious of texture, and of most agreeable flavor.’ He then named it after this town. In 1869 Dr. Thomas B. Welch of Vineland, New Jersey pioneered a method of processing concord grapes into pure unfermented grape juice and thus laid the foundation for an entire new industry.”
“These Concord grape vines were planted to honor Ephraim Wales Bull, a citizen of Concord, who in 1853, perfected a native American grape that, in Mr. Bull’s words, was ‘Delicious of texture, and of most agreeable flavor.’ He then named it after this town. In 1869 Dr. Thomas B. Welch of Vineland, New Jersey pioneered a method of processing concord grapes into pure unfermented grape juice and thus laid the foundation for an entire new industry.”

 

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